Author Topic: Careers.  (Read 28220 times)

ISG

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Re: Careers.
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2007, 11:54:31 AM »
I have been a paralegal for about 20 years. It is a VERY good fit.  I can work independently and skills such as my ability to "hyperfocus" have proven invaluable.  Another good fit is document coding, altho' the pay isn't as good.  It can be done in either an office setting or at home.

GroovyCD

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Re: Careers.
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2007, 11:53:47 AM »
One thing I am finding frustrating about the paralegal position is that it seems paralegals are expected to interview clients, which I am not comfortable doing.

Also, I object to the concept of networking. It seems highly unethical to me to give a job to someone based solely on the fact that they have "connections."

Have you run into these issues?

ISG

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Re: Careers.
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2007, 06:05:07 PM »
It depends on the type of law in which you work.  If you work in divorce or criminal law, you may end up doing a lot of client interaction.  In personal injury law, you may or may not have to interview the clients, but it's usually according to a script of sorts -- you're asking them basic background information about themselves, possibly their family, the incident in question, the medical practitioners they've seen, etc. 
In insurance defense work, you rarely speak to or even see a client, because many are corporate entities.  That's where the pure data type of jobs are: summarizing medical records, historical and factual research about a company factory site or product, document coding, summarizing depositions and so forth. 
I've found that it works best for me if I schedule the interview work for times when the office is quiet or when I feel most "up" -- and I sort of slip in into Interview Mode. 

bhayes

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Re: Careers.
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2007, 06:08:58 PM »
i understand i made a small post about this in the other forums

http://hiddengiftsoftheintrovertedchild.com/forum/index.php?topic=1265.0

pammihsp

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Re: Careers and creative unconventional right-brainers
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2008, 11:32:42 PM »
After reading the messages here so far in the careers section I feel a little better. I seem to be older than the rest of you, but I want to make a distinction that is important: Not all introverts are good at working with numbers/facts/details/clerical things.

INFJ and INFP---and even INTP are better working with "the big picture" and with concepts.In my specific case, I have bills to pay---life goes on---I can't live with my mom and dad. The real world demands are exhausting.

In addition to being quite likely either INFJ or INTP, I have dyscalculea and mild dyslexia, and trouble understanding what people MEAN when they speak. I hear words just fine, it's a case of not recalling what was said or just not getting the meaning that the person intended. Now these little handicaps really put the lid on finding a right-fitting career. I have an professionally tested IQ of about 136. I have not gone to college but my reading level was tested out at about the PhD level.

Introversion? Wow. People drain me. Two or three hours a day of face to face interaction is all I can take. I also am literally, physically unable to do things FAST. I interact with my world/environment slowly.  Einstein once asked that people spek to him slowly because he "listens slowly". (My brain processes incoming info slowly, but yet my "output" is fast.)

Try to find a career FOR THAT!
I enjoy writing screen plays. I enjoy public speaking---but so far these are in the preliminary stages.
It takes time to do these things---to set up a career---to make a name for yourself. Meanwhile, the bills must be paid and getting a conventional day-to-day job with no degree and learning disabilities makes life a rea hell.

Has anyone got some sspamestions?

HelpDeskNinja

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Re: Careers.
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2008, 02:27:32 PM »
Consulting maybe?

radames

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Re: Careers.
« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2008, 06:04:13 PM »
Pammi, possibly research, something that eliminates, or greatly limits, social interaction, where you can work at your own pace.  Maybe something in the computer field?  In addition, creating your own business with a focus on practically using your talents could be beneficial, if you are motivated to do thus.  Unfortunately, at the initial stage of this there may be a lot of marketing needed which, inevitably, leads to social interaction, ugh.  I am a truck driver at the moment, and have an IQ of about 122 (online quickie test).  I have my Master's Degree in Voice, so, I am more able to be extroverted but still very balanced with my introversion.  I am an opera singer and am working on my voice each day.  Ironically, I have recently learned that accepting myself is helping my voice balance out so much more.  In the past, I have tried to make myself something it wasn't which, in essence, was a rejection of me.  Now, I can accept me.  I hope you can find more ideas for a career.

nqr

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Re: Careers.
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2008, 03:06:04 AM »
I chose maybe a bad career for an introvert - speech therapist.  Other people who find out you're a speech therapist tend to assume you must like talking in front of groups etc., which I loathe.  Although I work with school-aged children in schools, and most of the day is spent in 1 on 1 or small group (3 kids max.) sessions with children, so at least I don't have to sell myself/make BS small talk too much.  I normally spend as much, if not more, time listening to others speak than I do talking.  One good thing about the job is that I mostly work on my own, and aren't part of a 'team' nearly as much as the teachers in the school.  I also usually have time to myself after the school day has finished to wind down.  One school I work at though tries to encourage all staff to go to the staff room at recess, and I avoid it as much as possible.  I don't mind talking to others who I have something in common with, but I *hate* small talk, and it seems very forced to make conversation if ever I go there.  I just don't have that much in common with any of them.   I have thought about changing careers numerous times.  Becoming a medical records coder appeals to me, but I would have to take a pay cut and give up getting the school holidays  :(